Commercials Need to Follow Program Standards

In Media by Daniel M. Clark8 Comments

I'm watching Nick Jr. with my three year old daughter right now, and I have a question. Since when is it okay for the between-show commercials on Nick Jr. to market hair care products on the premise that they will make your hair “sexy”? Now, I'm no prude. I don't think that children of all ages need to be shielded from every marginally grown-up word or concept until they hit 18 years old. I think that, for the most part, people who raise the “WE NEED TO PROTECT THE CHILDREN!!!!!” battle cry are using kids as an excuse to censor ideas and language that they simply don't like.

Nobody had to explain to a 5-year-old what Bill Clinton did with Monica, and anyone that says they did is either lying or they didn't realize that 5-year-olds are really easy to distract with a shiny object. I'm old-school; I firmly believe in simply telling a kid that some things are for grown-ups and some things are for kids and leaving it at that. It worked for me when I was a kid, and it's working great with my own daughter.

I do think that the commercials need to match the programs, though. When I'm watching shows on the Food Network, I fully expect the commercials to be food-related. When I'm watching The Shield, I expect the commercials to be aimed at adults. I don't want to see a commercial for Barbie dolls during The Sopranos, it's inappropriate.

It's also inappropriate to run a commercial for Pantene hair care products between Dora the Explorer and Diego featuring a beautiful woman in a short black dress who says of her hair, “I think volume is sexy”. There's a time and a place for everything, and I think that if they wouldn't use a word or concept in the show, they shouldn't use it in the commercials attached to the show. If Dora ever turns to Boots and says “you know, Boots, I think when my hair is up like this, it's really sexy”, then I'll have no problem with Nick Jr. running the Pantene ad.

Comments

  1. I agree completely! I have a hard enough time trying to get my 14 year olds to understand they don't need to be “sexy” and now I hear it from my 6 year old daughter's mouth too: “Mm mommy, doesn't this perfume smell sexy?” They don't hear that talk from me.

  2. I agree completely! I have a hard enough time trying to get my 14 year olds to understand they don't need to be “sexy” and now I hear it from my 6 year old daughter's mouth too: “Mm mommy, doesn't this perfume smell sexy?” They don't hear that talk from me.

  3. Oh, totally – no doubt about it. And honestly, it's not because I'm a Dad and I'm mad that they're not aimed at me 😉 lol

    But really, I think the point of view still stands. Moms get enough advertising thrown at them during the rest of the day, I'm sure none of them would mind being ignored for the five minute break between Nick Jr. shows.

  4. Oh, totally – no doubt about it. And honestly, it's not because I'm a Dad and I'm mad that they're not aimed at me 😉 lol

    But really, I think the point of view still stands. Moms get enough advertising thrown at them during the rest of the day, I'm sure none of them would mind being ignored for the five minute break between Nick Jr. shows.

  5. Oh, totally – no doubt about it. And honestly, it's not because I'm a Dad and I'm mad that they're not aimed at me 😉 lol

    But really, I think the point of view still stands. Moms get enough advertising thrown at them during the rest of the day, I'm sure none of them would mind being ignored for the five minute break between Nick Jr. shows.

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